Member News 3/19-3/25

Member News

  • Axiom Bank recently hired Jennifer Waddell as Vice President, Area Manager in Orlando and promoted Dwayne Haugabrook as Vice President, Area Manager in Tampa.
  • Lauren Raines joins Bradley’s Tampa Office as banking & financial services and real estate partner.
  • Greenberg Traurig adds West Holden and Cayla McCrea Page as associates to the Tampa office.
  • Memorial Hospital of Tampa welcomes Rosebel Monteiro, MD.
  • Shumaker attorneys recognized as top lawyers 2019 by Tampa Magazine.
  • Sykes names Symphony Ventures co-founder, Ian Barkin, its’ new CSO/CMO; solidifying its’ commitment to becoming the industry’s top automation-led BPO.
  • Trenam Law expands bankruptcy and creditors’ rights practice with addition of Lynn Welter Sherman as Shareholder.

Member Events

Member Job Openings

If you would like to submit news, events, job postings, new hires/promotions, or accolades for the Member News section of eView, please go to  http://www.tampachamber.com/Your-Chamber/Newsroom/MemberNews.aspx.

LT’19 Port Tampa Bay/Agriculture Day

By Shelley Sharp, Ryan Nece Foundation

What do strawberries, corn dogs, potash, and midnight buffets have in common?

They are all major contributors to the economic success of the Tampa Bay region.

Plant City is the winter strawberry capital of the world. 67 local farming families grow strawberries on 10,000 acres yielding 25 – 30,000 strawberries per acre and distribute primarily to the Eastern Seaboard and Canada. The annual strawberry harvest has an economic impact of more than $800 million.

Local farmers know success in the fields is as much an art as a science. They are always working to develop new strawberry varieties, and improved techniques for farming, harvesting and packaging.

Researchers at the University of Florida in Plant City recently introduced Florida Brilliance, a new strawberry variety resistant to damage from heavy rainfall.

The Florida Strawberry Festival has the largest attendance of any Florida festival with over 500,000 festival goers, 2500 volunteers, 24 national concerts on the new Wish Farms Soundstage ($5 million investment) and 400 vendors who serve corn dogs, deep fried Oreos, and  a strawberry delicacy for everyone including: ice cream, pizza, jam, sandwiches, milkshakes, pie, cobbler, parfaits, creampuffs, fritters, donuts, kettle korn, fudge, lemonade, chocolate dipped strawberries, and of course strawberry shortcake!

It was exciting to meet the Golden Girls, Dorothy and Blanche, and hear from high school students participating in the steer, swine, and lamb shows and auctions. Students involved with the sale of plants and livestock earned over $900,000 in 2018, most of which is used for college funds and to buy additional livestock.  A 2015 study showed the economic impact of the festival to be over $11 million net revenue for Hillsborough County.

Our sponsor for the day, Mosaic, is the worldwide leader in the production of fertilizer. Over 3000 local Tampa Bay employees and 3000 contract employees mine and produce phosphate and potash products. In addition to fertilizer, Mosaic is involved with land leases for cattle and citrus, public fish management areas, public parks on reclaimed mines, bee hives, and has donated $4.9 million to community farmers in Florida.

In 2018 Port Tampa Bay celebrated reaching the milestone of 1 million cruise passengers on four major cruise lines. These passengers along with 34 million tons of cargo contributed $17.2 billion and 85,000 jobs to the local economy. A recent $ 5 million investment in two Gantry cranes has allowed the port to be even more competitive for cargo container shipping. Port Tampa Bay has recently won two contracts with Asian and French companies.

Mosaic and TECO are two of the leading users of Port Tampa Bay, the largest and most diversified seaport in Florida.  This powerhouse triumvirate make up each other’s largest customers and/or suppliers. Together, they have important public/private partnerships with the Audubon Society, Florida Aquarium, and the Army Corp of Engineers for shipping channel improvements.

Our eLiTe’19 class had the wonderful opportunity to see Port Tampa Bay up close with a boat tour onboard the Bay Spirit II at the end of our very informative day.

Who’s ready for a cruise to Fantasy Island?  Fantasy Island is a joint partnership with the Tampa Port Authority, Florida Aquarium, Florida Dept. of Environmental Protection and Environmental Protection Commission of Hillsborough County for educational and eco-tour programs.

 

 

Member News 3/11-3/18

Member News

 

Member Events

  • March 21, 2019: FRLA’s Hillsborough Chapter Presents: Human Trafficking Awareness Training Course and Certification
  • March 23, 2019: Children’s Home Network General H. Norman Schwarzkopf Memorial Sporting Clays Classic
  • March 23, 2019: Hillsborough County Children’s Services 5th Annual Community Fair
  • March 26, 2019: Tampa Downtown Partnership Downtown Debriefing Series: Economic Impact from Tourism & Events
  • April 4, 2019: CAMLS Blood Drive
  • April 7, 2019: Center for Cyber Safety and Education Golfing with Garfield
  • April 12, 2019: Tampa Downtown Partnership Downtown Development Forum
  • April 12, 2019: Visit Tampa Bay Tee Off for Tourism Golf Tournament
  • April 25, 2019: Champions for Children Cheers for Champions Happy Hour
  • April 25, 2019: Tampa Downtown Partnership Downtown Security Series: Cybersecurity
  • May 8, 2019: Tampa Downtown Partnership Local Leaders Luncheon
  • May 17-18, 2019: Quest Inc. Wine Quest
  • June 5, 2019: Tampa Downtown Partnership Annual Hurricane Preparedness Meeting

Member Job Openings

If you would like to submit news, events, job postings, new hires/promotions, or accolades for the Member News section of eView, please go to  http://www.tampachamber.com/Your-Chamber/Newsroom/MemberNews.aspx.

Member News 3/5-3/11

Member News

 

Member Events

  • March 16, 2019: Tampa Downtown Partnership Mayor’s River O’Green Volunteer Opportunity
  • March 17, 2019: Henry B. Plant Museum 15th Annual Picnic in the Park
  • March 21, 2019: FRLA’s Hillsborough Chapter Presents: Human Trafficking Awareness Training Course and Certification
  • March 23, 2019: Children’s Home Network General H. Norman Schwarzkopf Memorial Sporting Clays Classic
  • March 23, 2019: Hillsborough County Children’s Services 5th Annual Community Fair
  • March 26, 2019: Tampa Downtown Partnership Downtown Debriefing Series: Economic Impact from Tourism & Events
  • April 4, 2019: CAMLS Blood Drive
  • April 7, 2019: Center for Cyber Safety and Education Golfing with Garfield
  • April 12, 2019: Tampa Downtown Partnership Downtown Development Forum
  • April 12, 2019: Visit Tampa Bay Tee Off for Tourism Golf Tournament
  • April 25, 2019: Tampa Downtown Partnership Downtown Security Series: Cybersecurity
  • May 8, 2019: Tampa Downtown Partnership Local Leaders Luncheon
  • May 17-18, 2019: Quest Inc. Wine Quest
  • June 5, 2019: Tampa Downtown Partnership Annual Hurricane Preparedness Meeting

Member Job Openings

If you would like to submit news, events, job postings, new hires/promotions, or accolades for the Member News section of eView, please go to  http://www.tampachamber.com/Your-Chamber/Newsroom/MemberNews.aspx.

Leadership (T)Amplified

TAMPLIFIED FOR TEACHERS
By Ernest Hooper
The Hillsborough Education Foundation and Hillsborough County Public Schools partner every year to celebrate “Excellence in Education” and recognize some of the school district’s most deserving employees.

 

The event annually celebrates outstanding teachers, school diversity contributors and instructional support personnel. It draws thousands to the David A. Straz Center.

 

Yet what all those people don’t know is the event has doubled as a Leadership Tampa 2003 reunion.

 

For the past four years, I’ve had the honor of hosting the event. Bruce Faulmann, the Tampa Bay Times’ vice president of advertising/marketing, has watched from the audience for each of those award celebrations as a member of the education foundation. For the past three years, Suncoast Credit Union vice president Gary Vien has joined me on stage as the presenter for the instructional support award finalists. The credit union serves as the event’s primary sponsor.

 

Bruce, Gary and I spent a magical year together as members of the Leadership Tampa 2003 class. Everyone in LTA insists their class was the best, and we’re no different. We spent days immersed in various aspects of city dynamics, and evenings in debriefings, debating everything from politics to sports.

 

At the time, Bruce worked for the Times’ rival, the Tampa Tribune, and Gary toiled for Busch Gardens. Now Bruce is with the Times and Gary works for Suncoast. Of course, we’re still the same guys, albeit a little older and wiser. We’re always excited to see each other at the event, and excited to help the foundation.

 

As a HEF board member for many years, I see firsthand HEF’s impact on the school district, its teachers and students through their many programs from the Teaching Tools Store to scholarship and mentoring,” Bruce told me after the event. “But absolutely my favorite is our celebration of Hillsborough County’s best teachers and staff at our annual Excellence in Education awards.”

 

This year, the theme was “A Night in Paris,” so I donned a beret. Truth be told I looked more like Rerun from What’s Happening and little like a French gentleman. That’s okay. If humbling myself by resembling a 1980s sitcom star leads to honoring teachers, I’m all for it.

 

It’s always an inspiring evening with many moving moments the ceremony always produces. A student escort introduces each of the finalists, and the kids frequently offer cute but poignant tributes. The teachers gush and blush and the winners never fail to bring emotion to the podium.

 

“The evening warms your heart and takes you from laughter to tears,” Bruce said. “The kids can sell! You’re rooting for them all.

 

“Adding to awesomeness of the evening is watching my talented LT ’03 classmates. Hoop, aka Rerun, as the ever-charming emcee, and Gary, as the presenting sponsor, representing Suncoast Credit Union. Both could stand-in for Pat Sajak or Alex Trebek if either needed a night off.”

 

This year, when the Ida S. Baker Diversity Award winner, Newsome High’s Sandra Misciasci, heard her name called she sobbed and offered a long list of tearful thank yous. Gary and I could only look at each other and think, “This is what this event is all about. This is why we show up every year.”
“Never could I imagine back in 2003 while at Leadership Tampa, that I would be presenting at the 2019 Excellence in Education awards with others from our Leadership Tampa Class. Being able to congratulate 678 nominees and the 13 finalists is very heartwarming.”

“This is Tampa. This is why we continue to give back. What a fantastic journey and one that continues to give back as much as you put in to a city focused on the future.”

As Leadership Tampa Alumni looks to create a partnership with the district, I think it would be thrilling to have a larger contingent of LTA members at this event next year. We can come to not only show our support for the current education system, but to embrace the concept of paying it forward and thanking the teachers who helped change the trajectory of our own lives.

 

It would be great if I could look out from that stage next year and thank LTA for its support and recognize more than just Bruce and Gary.

 

That’s all I’m saying.

Ernest Hooper, LT’03
2018 Newsletter/Annual Review Chair
Editor and Columnist, Tampa Bay Times
Follow him @hoop4you

Leadership (T)Amplified

Mark House hasn’t jumped out of a plane since leaving the U.S. Army in 1985, but not a day goes by he doesn’t refer to the experience or his days as a West Point cadet.
“West Point gave me my foundation,” said House, the managing director and director of strategic projects for the Beck Group, an architectural, engineering and construction firm.
“My parents first and foremost, but West Point really gave me a lot of the core values, professional values that I use every day.”
House often calls on the leadership qualities instilled in him by his mother, Sue House, and his father, the late Army colonel and fellow West Point graduate, Joe House. And those qualities have served him well as a businessman and a community leader.
He’s twice served as chair of the Hillsborough County Economic Development Corporation, is a board member at ZooTampa, guided the Leadership Tampa Class of 2013 as its chair, and currently holds a spot on the West Point Association of Graduates Board.
His work recently led to him winning the prestigious Leadership Tampa Alumni Parke Wright III Leadership Award. House spoke to Ernest Hooper about winning the award, leadership and what LTA means to him.
How surprised were you?
I was completely shocked. I borrowed a coat to come. There was a guy in the office who does work for us. Someone said you’ve got to go to this luncheon because we’re giving an award to one of our subcontractor partners. They said you need to be there for that. This is 30 minutes before the luncheon. There’s a young man in the lobby that does a lot of work for us. He’s a consultant. I didn’t have a sport coat. I looked at him. He’s my size. I said, “What are you doing today at lunchtime? I need to borrow your coat.” I got to the luncheon and sat down and it wasn’t until I turned and saw my wife standing by the wall and realized something was up.
They came in just a little bit too early.
Yeah. Then, I was reflecting on it and every time I went to one, somebody gave a great, big long nice speech. I thought, I’m screwed. Then, I started trying to put some things together. My legs were shaking. My calves were twitching.
That’s surprising to see a leader like you a bit unnerved.
Well, it was about me. It’s usually about everybody else. You’re very, very honored, but you’re going, “This is about me and I’m about everybody else. I love everybody else.” It was very humbling, especially when you have the people speaking in the video. To hear the things they said really choked me up. You see everybody very frequently and people don’t say emotional things to each other.
We don’t say I love you enough.
That’s one thing about I love you – man, woman, whatever – you talk to people I work with and I tell them I love them. They’re my family as much as my real family. So, I got pretty emotional.
You support a lot of causes. Which one are you most passionate about?
It has changed a little bit. Right now, I’m on the board of advisors for West Point. That’s my current passion. But in 2008, when the recession came, it was devastating for our industry. Unemployment in Tampa went from about 4 percent, and our industry it was less than that. But by 2010-2012, in the architecture, engineering, construction industry, it was in the 40 percent range. It was devastating. Our annual revenue dropped by 70 percent. We dropped our total employee base by 70 percent, from 140 local employees down to 25. During that time, nobody did anything wrong. People were working as hard as they could. There just wasn’t any work. If you don’t have any work, you can’t build anything. Some people changed industries. They moved out of town. I felt like the only thing I could do was lead the way by trying to create work.
So you decided to move into Tampa Heights?
We put a stake in the ground. We needed to be in a place where we designed and built a cool building and we needed to be in a place where we could make an impact, try to give back and be the first people out there. We weren’t the very first, but we were pretty close to it. So, I got very involved in the EDC, which was part of the Chamber’s old Committee of 100. I chaired that for a couple of years and did everything I possibly could to try to get companies to come to town. If a company would come to town, it didn’t necessarily mean we would build anything for them, but it created this kind of a pyramid you know, they came and trickle down happened.
What did you learn?
I learned more and more about the city. I thought I knew a lot about the city. I thought I knew a lot about people. But during that time, it was, “Hey man, we gotta all lock arms together and figure out ways in which we can help our community grow and get out of this recession.” I got some great friends out of that. You know, in hard times when people bond together, you end up having some really, really good friends.
I always say Tampa is the biggest small town in America. Do you agree with that?
Yes, I do. In my job now, I’m responsible for our strategic projects throughout the company: our healthcare business, our life science business, which is the pharmaceutical business and I travel around to all our different offices. We have offices in Denver, Fort Worth, Dallas, our headquarters, Austin, Charlotte, Atlanta and Mexico City. I’m biased, but this is the place that I want to be. We’re not a small city anymore. We’re competing on the stage and we’re starting to act like that. It used to be the best kept secret in America. It’s not a secret anymore. People go, “Oh, you’re from Tampa.” They know about Tampa.
What’s been the biggest benefit of Leadership Tampa and Leadership Tampa Alumni?
When I went through Leadership Tampa, it was the hook that said look at all this stuff that Tampa does. There’s so much more about Tampa than you could ever know. In Leadership Tampa, you had 55 classmates that you became really good friends with. There’s not a week that goes by that I don’t see somebody who was a classmate. It’s probably the single best organizational experience that you can have in in Tampa. And if you call a Leadership Tampa classmate or an alum, they’ll pick up the phone. That’s something that’s very important.

Ernest Hooper, LT’03
2018 Newsletter/Annual Review Chair
Editor and Columnist, Tampa Bay Times
Follow him @hoop4you

LT’19 Transportation Day

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By Gina Evans, Tampa International Airport

Transportation impacts all of our industries and on February 20th we had the opportunity to spend the day with leaders in our community followed by experiencing various transportation modes in Tampa ourselves.  The day began at Tampa International Airport (TPA) and concluded with “The Amazing Race.” I mean “Experience.”

The day kicked off with an overview of TPA’s three-phase Master Plan beginning with the decongestion of Phase 1 and ending with expansion of Phase 3 presented by Executive Vice President of Facilities and Maintenance, Al Illustrato.  Interim Director of Marketing, Danny Cooper, provided an overview of Air Service Development and the economic impact of TPA on our community.

Key points:

  • TIA is in Albania, Tampa International Airport is TPA
  • TPA has a legacy of innovation and leadership in our community
  • TPA’s logo, Spirit of flight, means traveling fast from right to left while the sun is setting over the water

Following these presentations, Tyler Hudson provided an overview and update on the “All for Transportation” referendum.  The top two concerns countywide were safety and congestion.  Jeff Seward referred to the new Chief Executive Officer of HART as the “Chief Expectations Officer” in regard to the referendum as the new CEO begins to implement the doubling of the budget in a year while balancing all of the opportunities to grow connectivity.

We then went on a tour of TPA including the extensive baggage screening system, USO, Travelers Aid, the police department and the Airport Operations Center (AOC).

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Key points:

  • TPA has over four miles of baggage system belts
  • Not every airport has an USO and this is a great resource for our military families in Tampa
  • Travelers Aid plays a crucial role with staffing from The Crisis Center
  • TPA has their own police department with holding cells
  • The AOC is the nerve center of the airport property and operations

During a working lunch, there was a panel discussion on smart cities with Marshall Pearsall, Senior Project Manager, KCI Technologies, Ron Katzman, Director of Strategy & Operations, SME Solutions, and Jeff Seward, Interim CEO of HART.

Key points:

  • Technology brings efficiency to all modes of transportation
  • Connected vehicles go beyond individuals and even to waste management trucks
  • Smart Cities are the new competition for businesses and growth

The afternoon took us on an experience where we had to use seven of 10 transportation modes (Walking, Coast Bike Share, HART bus, HART in-towner, The Downtowner, Street Car, TNCs, Taxi Cabs, ZipCar, Pirate Water Taxi)  to six different locations  (Amalie Arena, Armature Works, Blind Tiger Ybor, Florida Aquarium, Tampa Fire Museum, and University of Tampa) with challenges and amazing pictures.  The experience taught all of us the challenges of how even the newest technology, Teslsa’s Downtowner wait times, had its flaws while balancing the modes throughout Tampa.

Image may contain: 5 people, including Charlotte McHenry and Janessa Canals Alonso, people smiling, bicycle and outdoor

Overall, the key themes were how innovation plays a critical role in all forms of transportation and as the city continues to grow all options need to be on the table to meet the needs of the various populations in our community.