Tampa Wins National League of Cities Award for Afterschool Programs, Celebrates Lights on Afterschool Day Oct. 20

Celebrating the Importance of Afterschool Programs TAMPA, FL (Oct. 20, 2011) – The National League of Cities has named Tampa one of the 27 most advanced cities in the U.S. for its efforts to coordinate afterschool opportunities for children and youth. The announcement is the result of a research report commissioned by the Wallace Foundation and published by the National League of Cities Institute for Youth, Education and Families.



Other cities include Boston, Chicago, New York, Washington, D.C. and Jacksonville, the only other Florida city represented. Six key elements identified by the Wallace Foundation as essential for building sustainable, coordinated afterschool systems include:  committed leadership, a public or private coordinating entity, multi-year planning, reliable information, expanding participation, and a commitment to quality. 



The honor came as Tampa and Hillsborough County out-of-school programs took part in the nationwide Afterschool Alliance 12th Annual Lights On Afterschool rallies the afternoon of Oct. 20. The local rallies – held at Boys & Girls Clubs, schools, parks and recreation locations, and faith-based and other providers – brought attention to afterschool programs, which have suffered recent budget cuts across the country.  As part of the “Lights On” rallies the Suntrust Building in Tampa was fully lit the evening of Oct. 20.



“Afterschool programs inspire children to learn, keep kids safe and allow parents to work,” said Bobbi Davis, resource development manager at the Children’s Board of Hillsborough County, head of the Hillsborough Out-of-School Time committee and an ambassador with the Afterschool Alliance. Davis secured a grant from the U.S. Department of Education’s 21st Century Community Learning Center, the only federal afterschool funding in the country, which goes through the Children’s Board to benefit three Tampa Boys & Girls Clubs.



For more information about the National League of Cities announcement and the complete list of winners, click here.  For more information about the Afterschool Alliance Lights On Afterschool initiative, click here.



The Children’s Board of Hillsborough County serves as the leading voice and advocate for children and families in our community. The board is the only organization of its kind in Hillsborough County that generates revenue to help children and families. The Children’s Board is recognized nationally for its contributions to best practices in policies and programs aiding children and families. Citizens may visit www.childrensboard.org to learn more about the board’s programs.

Volunteers Inspire Hillsborough County 8th Graders

More than 200 volunteers stepped back into the classroom today to help inspire 8th graders in Hillsborough County during our annual Diploma-See Initiative. Participants who sign on to present Junior Achievement‘s Economics for Success may be business people, company employees, educators, parents, students or community leaders.

The objective? Share personal work and life experiences which reinforce the importance of staying in school.

Here’s a peek at some of the happenings at Franklin, Ferrell and Young Middle Schools. For more photos, visit our Facebook page.

Couldn’t Make it to SBOY? Check out the photos!

Just in case you couldn’t attend our Annual Small Business of the Year Awards banquet on September 16, we’re happy to share some photos from the evening! Visit our Facebook page to see more.

Delegation gets brief on RNC’s impact in Philly

David Cohen addresses Tampa delegation

Benchmarking this morning…

Got briefed by David Cohen, the chair of the 2000 host committee that got the RNC to Phily.

Takeaways for Tampa:

    1. Make it an effort to have a long-lasting impact on tourism/hospitality – not just a one-time show.
    2. Create separate/dedicated transportation system for delegates – make them feel very special and make it so they can go wherever they want to go around the area – free of charge.
    3. Create promotional program for area restaurants.  This was the most disappointed group in Philly – they had high expectations for business, but it didn’t come through because delegates were at the convention from 6 – 10:00 each night.  Definitely make public pitch to get locals out in restaurants.
    4. Like baseball’s Fanfest and basketball’s Jamfest, create Politiicalfest – a multimedia celebration of American politics.  Make a replica of oval office.  Create a mock up of the convention stage and allow people to give speeches – with balloon drops and all.  Sell DVD’s of their speech.  Have political memorabilia vendors come in.
    5. Do video feeds from convention – put up big screens strong city where public can watch.  Engage the public – make it free and get local politicians (from both parties) to attend these events and mingle.  .
      Do a Host committee reception every night.  Non-partisan reception – thanks to biz community.
    6. The convention paid off in Phily – they’re consistently up on hotel nights compared to pre-convention and established the city as a player in major hospitality events.

Off to the airport…more later.

 

Tuesday Benchmarking – Politics and Stadiums

On benchmarking trip today…

Got Philly briefing from Mayor Nutter – Penn grad – very impressed with his grasp of city ops. Says he treats it like a business – he’s the CEO and the taxpayers are investors.

Dr Genshaft announced a multi-million dollar grant from BP to USF to further study effects of oil spill – Go Bulls!

Presentation on the inner-workings of Philly’s stadium deals by Tom Whitworth, of NorthMarq Financial and Sam Rhoades, Sr VP of Finance, PIDC (economic development arm) – very insightful. Tom has worked on several stadium deals, including the Marlins park in Miami; Sam is on economic development side from Philly’s perspective. They have the only sports complex in the country where professional football, baseball, basketball, and hockey are played. The combined parks – Lincoln Financial Field, Citizens Park, and the Wells Fargo Spectrum – have a combined 108,000 seats and parking for 22,000 cars.

Take-aways for Tampa –

  1. Make it about community impact….not about the stadium. Focus on how the project will impact the surrounding community both economically, and from a ‘quality of life’ perspective.
  2. Structure deal so the community shares in upside of increase value of franchise – get a piece of the action if team owners cash out after public money helped increase the value of the team.
  3. The stadium is storm shelter – example from Miami’s new park, which has retractable roof system.
  4. Make teams responsible for cost overruns – set up deal with capped commitment from public sector.
  5. Issue bonds on incremental new income – this could be done if there’s substantial upside in new revenue from a new stadium.

Off to the Liberty Bell and Constitution Hall!

Steve@plantz.us