The CARES Act Fact Sheet

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act provides robust funding streams, negotiated by House and Senate Democrats, to assist local governments and nonprofits in responding to the coronavirus pandemic. 

Disaster Relief Fund – $45 billion will support a broad array of state and local emergency response efforts related to the coronavirus pandemic.

Small Business

Paycheck Protection Program – $350 billion in funding (included in Division A of the bill) for a Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) that will provide small businesses and other entities with zero-fee loans of up to $10 million, with up to 8 weeks of average payroll and other costs forgiven if the business retains its employees and their salary levels. (For additional details, refer to the House Committee on Small Business.)

Emergency Economic Injury Grants – $10 billion in funding (included in Division A of the bill) for a provision to provide an advance of $10,000 to small businesses and nonprofits that apply for an SBA economic injury disaster loan (EIDL) within three days of applying for the loan. (For additional details, refer to the House Committee on Small Business.)

Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL) – $562 million to ensure that SBA has the resources to provide EIDL to businesses that need financial support.

Debt Relief for Existing and New SBA Borrowers – $17 billion in funding (included in Division A of the bill) for a provision to provide immediate relief to small businesses with standard SBA 7(a), 504, or microloans, among other relief for small business borrowers. (For additional details, refer to the House Committee on Small Business.)

Resources for Business Counseling Services – $275 million in grants (included in Division A of the bill) to Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs), Women’s Business Centers (WBCs), as well as the Minority Business Development Agency’s Business Centers (MBDCs), to provide mentorship, guidance and expertise to small businesses. (For additional details, refer to the House Committee on Small Business.)

NIST Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) Program – $50 million to enable non-profit MEP centers across the country to assist small and medium-sized manufacturers hit by coronavirus and the economic downturn.

Health Care  Reimbursement to Hospitals and Healthcare Providers – $100 billion to ensure healthcare providers continue to receive the support they need for COVID-19 related expenses and lost revenue.

HSSEF, Hospital Preparedness – Not less than $250 million to improve the capacity of healthcare facilities to respond to medical events.

PHSSEF, Strategic National Stockpile – $16 billion to procure personal protective equipment, ventilators, and other medical supplies for federal and state response efforts.

CDC state and local public health – $1.5 billion will help states, locals, territories, and tribes conduct vital public health activities related to preparedness and response.

Community Health Centers – $1.3 billion (included in Division A of the bill) for supplemental grants to health clinics to provide expanded health care services. (For additional details, refer to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.)

Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program – $90 million for supplemental grants to HIV/AIDS clinics.

Rural Hospitals – $150 million for grants to bolster capacity to respond to increased demand at rural hospitals.

Telehealth – $15 million for supplemental grants to existing grantees to expand telemedicine capacity.

Public Health Data Surveillance and Infrastructure Modernization – $500 million to build and modernize state and local public health data infrastructure.

SAMHSA Emergency Response Grant – $100 million in flexible funding to address mental health, substance use disorders, and provide resources and support to youth and the homeless during the pandemic.

Economic Development Economic Development Administration (EDA) – $1.5 billion for economic adjustment assistance, to be competitively awarded across the country, with states, local governments, tribes, economic development districts, universities, and other nonprofits eligible to apply.

Community Development Block Grant – $5 billion in flexible funding to state and local governments for public services, economic development and expansion of community facilities to respond to coronavirus.

Reconnect Broadband Grants – $100 million to state and local governments, federally-recognized tribes, and non-profits to fund the cost of construction, improvement or acquisition of facilities, and equipment needed to provide broadband in rural areas.

First Responders Emergency Management Performance Grant Program – $100 million will support efforts of state and local emergency managers to maintain, restore, and sustain food, water, shelter, healthcare, and transportation supply chains.

Assistance to Firefighter Grant Program – $100 million will support the acquisition of and reimbursement for personal protective equipment for firefighters and associated emergency response personnel.

Byrne Justice Assistance Grants – $850 million in criminal justice funding assistance to states and units of local government.

Legal Services Corporation – $50 million for additional assistance to non-profit legal aid programs across the country, to enable them to provide civil legal assistance to low-income persons affected by coronavirus and the economic downturn.

Transportation Grants-in-Aid to Airports – $10 billion will help publicly-owned commercial airports meet ongoing needs, continue current projects, and assist with operating costs.

Transit Infrastructure Grants – $25 billion will help transit operators protect health and safety and maintain transit service.  Recipients are transit agencies, awarded via formula.

Housing Tenant-Based Rental Assistance – $1.25 billion for public housing authorities to ensure that current tenants remain safely and stably housed and to address increased operational costs.

Public Housing Operating Fund – $685 million to help public housing authorities with increased operational costs related to coronavirus.

Native American Programs – $300 million for the Native American Housing Block Grant and Indian Community Development Block Grant programs, supporting Tribal governments and Tribally Designated Housing Entities.

Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS – $65 million state and local governments to maintain rental assistance and enhance services for persons living with HIV/AIDS.

Homeless Assistance Grants – $4 billion in funding to state and local governments to support additional homeless assistance, as well as eviction and homelessness prevention activities.

Education

Education State Fiscal Stabilization Fund – $30.75 billion, including $13.5 billion for local education agencies for K-12 needs and costs.

Project SERV – $100 million to help restore the learning environment at K-12 schools and universities disrupted by coronavirus.

Child Care and Development Block Grants – $3.5 billion will help child care programs pay staff, offer alternative child care options for facilities temporarily closed, and provide emergency staffing needs to support first responders and health care workers with access to child care while they respond to the pandemic.

Head Start – $750 million to support staff and students throughout closures, clean and sanitize facilities, and support summer school operations in communities as they recover.

Institute of Museum and Library Services – $50 million to provide funding to libraries and museums for activities associated with coronavirus prevention, preparation, and response, including technology costs.

Distance Learning and Telemedicine Grants – $25 million to state and local governments, federally-recognized tribes, and non-profits to fund capital assets, instructional programming, and technical assistance.

National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) – $75 million for grants to support the general operations of recipients, of which 60% will be through direct competitive grants and 40% will be through states.

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) – $75 million for grants to support the general operations of recipients, of which 60% will be through direct competitive grants and 40% will be through states.

Food Security Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP) – $450 million to local agencies selected by states, such as food banks, and to community action agencies to help provide low-income Americans, including seniors, with emergency food assistance at no cost.   Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR) – $100 million to provide USDA Foods to income-eligible households living on Indian reservations, and to American Indian households residing in approved areas near reservations and in Oklahoma.

Social Services Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) – $900 million will help lower-income households heat and cool their homes.

Community Service Block Grants – $1 billion will help communities address increasing unemployment and economic disruption, including providing housing and utility assistance, health services, and emergency support services.

Family Violence Prevention and Services – $45 million will support families dealing with family and domestic violence through shelter and supportive services.

Child Welfare Services – $45 million to protect and support at-risk children and families.

Corporation for Public Broadcasting – $75 million to provide stabilization funding for public radio and TV stations.

 

This entry was posted in Uncategorized by Tampa Bay Chamber. Bookmark the permalink.

About Tampa Bay Chamber

The Tampa Bay Chamber is a not-for-profit business membership organization that helps promote the businesses and business interests of our members. We come from diverse backgrounds: from small businesses, big corporations, government bodies and the military. United, we become a single, unifying force with the power to shape the future of Tampa Bay.